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Publishing with FTP using Windows

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Tutorial 1 of 2

Objectives:

  • Create a profile in WS_FTP.
  • Connect to a server using WS_FTP.
  • Tags discussed: none.

Readings:

  • none

Template File(s):

Video/Swf File(s):

Note: These two screen capture files will act as a visual guide to give you a better picture of how FTP works. Although the urls & username conventions are not the same, the method of using FTP is consistent. Watch them to gain a better overview of FTP or scroll down to read the text instructions. Happy FTPing! (Note: The videos are packaged in downloadable zip files. Download the files, extract them, and double click on the files listed below.)

WS_FTP

FTP stands for file transfer protocol, which you should be familiar with from the first lecture. It's just a common way to move files around on the Internet. Traditionally, ftp is a bunch of commands that you type in (which is not very easy to use). WS_FTP is a pogram that tries to make things a bit easier for you.

Getting Started

The first thing you see when you run the WS_FTP program, is something like the screen below:

sample WS_FTP interface

This can look a little overwhelming if this is your first time using FTP, so let's go over the important parts.

  • Profile Name: -- there are a lot of settings you need to connect to another computer and start using FTP, this lets you name and then save these settings so you don't have to type them in all the time.
  • Host Name/Address: -- this is the name of the machine you are connecting to (commonly called a "host"). Unlike the profile name you don't make this one up--you have to type in the exact name of the machine or you won't be able to connect to it.
  • Host Type: -- this is the operating system being used on the machine you are connect to. Almost all of the time it's best to just choose "Automatic Detect" which means WS_FTP will figure this part out for you.
  • User ID: -- this is the User ID you have on the host machine.
  • Password: -- this is the Password you have on the host machine.
  • Account: -- don't worry about this field.
  • Anonymous: -- don't worry about this checkbox.
  • Save Pwd: -- this saves your password so you don't have to type it in each time. If nobody else uses (and has access to) the machine you are working on, or if you just aren't worried about them connecting to your account on the host machine you can check this option.

There are also several tab menus, you can explore these if you want to but they are not necessary (unless you are doing this at work and have firewall issues, in which case you should ask your network administrator for help).

Example

Let's try creating a profile for your account on the server. Enter in the following settings:

  • Profile Name: Profile Name
  • Host Name/Address: Host Name/Address
  • Host Type: Automatic Detect
  • User ID: Username
  • Password: Password
  • Save Pwd: click this if the machine you work in is reasonably private.





Tutorial 2 of 2

Objectives:

  • Change directories using WS_FTP.
  • Move files using WS_FTP.
  • Delete files using WS_FTP.
  • View your web pages from the server.
  • Tags discussed: none

Readings:

  • none

Template File(s):


Video/Swf File(s):

Note: These two screen capture files will act as a visual guide to give you a better picture of how FTP works. Although the urls & username conventions are not the same, the method of using FTP is consistent. Watch them to gain a better overview of FTP or scroll down to read the text instructions. Happy FTPing! (Note: The videos are packaged in downloadable zip files. Download the files, extract them, and double click on the files listed below.)

Now that you're connected . . .

Now that you've actually connected to the server things can look even more confusing. You should see a screen similar to this one:

WS_FTP connected to remote site

Some of the important features:

  • Remote Site vs. Local System: -- The screen is split into a left half and a right half. The left half, or "local system", is the computer that you are using right now to run WS_FTP. The right half, or "remote system" is the server that you are currently connected to.
  • Location: -- Your location for your local system is displayed near the top of the screen. In this case, you are at the top "level" of the C: drive. This location is mimicked on the right hand side of the screen. It should display a path followed immediately by your username (which is a directory on the server) when you first connect. The path for the remote site is "/home/example" because the username for the account I had when creating this tutorial was "example".
  • Files and folders: -- Immediately below the location, you can see a list of all the files and folders contained for that specific "place" on both the local machine and the remote site. Files look mostly like white boxes, and folders look like little yellow folders.
  • The green arrow: -- We'll talk about this in a bit, but for now, just make sure you know where it is.

Changing Directories

Changing directories is pretty simple, all you do is double click on the directory you want to go to. This takes you one level "down" the directory tree. If you click on the green arrow, you will go back "up" one level.

Creating Directories/Folder

Creating directories is pretty simple, all you do is double click on the "MkDir" buttton, then type in the name.

If you do not see a directory called "site" on the remote site, create one now. You only need to do this once.

Example

Try double clicking on the "site" folder. Note how the location on the remote host has expanded in include the "site" directory. This is actually the location where you will keep your web site. It is set up so that the rest of the world can "see" it on the internet without having to give the server a username and password.

Experiment with changing directories on your local machine and the remote site. Try to find the location you've stored some of the html files you have worked on up to this point.

Moving files

To move files, you highlight the file (or directory) you want to move then click on one of the two arrows in the middle of the screen that points toward the opposite machine.

Example

  • Change directories on your local machine until you can see some of the html files you worked on from the previous tutorials.
  • Highlight one of the files.
  • Click on the arrow in the middle that points to the right.

If your sound card is working, you should hear a cheerful little "ding" letting you know that your file was moved over to the server. The process works much the same way for moving files to your local maching from the remote site.

As I mentioned above, you don't have to move just one file, you can highlight multiple files or even directories and move them all at once.

Deleting files

Deleting files is easy, just highlight the files (or folders) you want to delete and click on the delete button.

Note: There are two delete buttons, so make sure you click on the one for the machine (either local system, or remote site) that you want to delete files from.

Viewing your hard work

Any files you have in your site directory are on the Internet! Anyone can now see them if they have the right URL. To view your files, point your browser to:

Note: Usernames are not always required. Your website host should tell you how to access your site from a browser or FTP program.

http://hostname/username/filename

Try pointing to the default file in your directory

http://hostname/username/index.html
This file gives you some basic information about the server. Note that
http://hostname/username/index.html
and
http://hostname/username/
point to the same file. You may change the contents of this file after you have read it.

For example, if I have a file "mywebpage.html" in the site folder and my username is "mimi", I point to:

http://hostname/~mimi/mywebpage.html

For example, if I have a file "final.html" in the folder "homework" which is a sub-folder of "site" and my username is "mimi", I point to:

http://hostname/~mimi/homework/final.html

For an live link, follow the URL below:

ocw.usu.edu

You should practice the process of using WS_FTP and then testing the results in your browser.

[End of tutorial]

Copyright 2008, by the Contributing Authors. Cite/attribute Resource . admin. (2008, May 20). Publishing with FTP using Windows. Retrieved January 07, 2011, from Free Online Course Materials — USU OpenCourseWare Web site: http://ocw.usu.edu/instructional-technology-learning-sciences/producing-distance-education-resources/resource11.html. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons License
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