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Agency, B. E. C. T. A. (2001). Computer Games in Education Project (PDF). Retrieved July 15, 2005, from http://www.becta.org.uk/research/research.cfm?section=1&id;=2826

Aldrich, C. (2005). Chapter 8: The three essential elements to successful educational experiences: Simulations, games, and pedagogy. In Learning by doing: A comprehensive guide to simulations, computer games, and pedagogy in e-learning and other educational experiences . San Francisco: Pfeiffer.

Bernstein, C. (2001). Chapter 8: Play it again, Pac-man (HTML). In M. J. P. Wolf (Ed.), The Medium of the Video Game (pp. 93-112). Austin: University of Texas Press.

Crawford, C. (1997). Chapter 1: What is a game? (HTML) In The Art of Computer Game Design : Washington State University.

Crawford, C. (1997). Chapter 2: Why do people play games? (HTML) In The Art of Computer Game Design : Washington State University.

Crawford, C. (1997). Chapter 5: The game design sequence (HTML). In The Art of Computer Game Design : Washington State University.

Crawford, C. (1997). Chapter 6: design techniques and ideals (HTML). In The Art of Computer Game Design : Washington State University.

Deshrill, M. (2004). Interview with Nick Montfort (HTML) . Retrieved August 16, 2005, from http://www.eboredom.20m.com/features/interviews/montfort1.html

Frasca, G. (2003). Chapter 10: Simulation versus narrative: Introduction to ludology (PDF). In M. J. P. Wolf & B. Perron (Eds.), The Video Game Theory Reader (pp. 221-236). New York: Routledge.

Gee, J. P. (2003). Chapter 2: Semiotic domains: Is playing video games a "waste of time"? In What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy . New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

Grodal, T. (2003). Chapter 6: Stories for eye, ear, and muscles: Video games, media, and embodied experiences. In M. J. P. Wolf & B. Perron (Eds.), The Video Game Theory Reader (pp. 25-46). New York: Routledge.

Gunter, B. (1998). Chapter 2: Tapping into players' habits and preferences. In The Effects of Video Games on Children: The Myth Unmasked (pp. 29-48). Sheffield, England: Sheffield Academic Press.

Hayes, E. (2002, May 24-26). Find out who you really are: Adult learning in virtual worlds. Paper presented at the Adult Education Research Conference (AERC), North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.

Holland, W., Jenkins, H., & Squire, K. (2003). Chapter 1: Theory by design (PDF). In M. J. P. Wolf & B. Perron (Eds.), The Video Game Theory Reader (pp. 25-46). New York: Routledge.

Hunter, A. (2005). Zoom Manual (HTML) . Retrieved August 15, 2005, from www.logicalshift.demon.co.uk/unix/zoom/manual/index.html

Jelfs, A., & Whitelock, D. (2000). The notion of presence in virtual learning environments: What makes the environment "real". British Journal of Educational Technology , 31 (2), 145-152.

Kirriemuir, J. (2002). Video gaming, education and digital learning technologies (HTML). D-Lib Magazine , 8.

Kirriemuir, J. (2003). The relevance of video games and gaming consoles to the higher and further education learning experience (RTF) . Retrieved July 15, 2005, from www.ceangal.com

Kirriemuir, J., & McFarlane, A. Use of computer and video games in the classroom (PDF) .

Koster, R. (2005). Chapter 2: How the brain works. In A Theory of Fun for Game Design (pp. 12-33). Scottsdale, AZ: Paraglyph Press.

Koster, R. (2005). Chapter 3: What games are. In A Theory of Fun for Game Design (pp. 34-47). Scottsdale, AZ: Paraglyph Press.

Koster, R. (2005). Chapter 4: What games teach us. In A Theory of Fun for Game Design (pp. 48-79). Scottsdale, AZ: Paraglyph Press.

Koster, R. (2005). Chapter 5: What games aren't. In A Theory of Fun for Game Design (pp. 80-99). Scottsdale, AZ: Paraglyph Press.

Koster, R. (2005). Chapter 7: The problem with learning. In A Theory of Fun for Game Design (pp. 110-127). Scottsdale, AZ: Paraglyph Press.

Koster, R. (2005). Chapter 8: The problem with people. In A Theory of Fun for Game Design (pp. 128-139). Scottsdale, AZ: Paraglyph Press.

Koster, R. (2005). Chapter 9: Games in context. In A Theory of Fun for Game Design (pp. 140-159). Scottsdale, AZ: Paraglyph Press.

Masters, E. L. (1992). Spoon River Anthology (TXT) . New York: Signet Classic Penguin Group.

McAllister, K., & Moeller, R. (2004). Introduction. Works and Days 43/44: Capitalizing on play: The politics of computer gaming , 22 (1&2), 11-20.

McMahan, A. (2003). Chapter 3: Immersion, engagement, and presence: A method for analyzing 3-D video games. In M. J. P. Wolf & B. Perron (Eds.), The Video Game Theory Reader (pp. 25-46). New York: Routledge.

Miller, C. H. (2005). Chapter 8: Blending entertainment with other goals. In Digital Storytelling: A Creator's Guide to Interactive Entertainment (pp. 135-158). Burlington, MA: Focal Press Elsevier.

Miller, C. H. (2005). Chapter 9: Tackling projects for children. In Digital Storytelling: A Creator's Guide to Interactive Entertainment (pp. 159-182). Burlington, MA: Focal Press Elsevier.

Miller, C. H. (2005). Chapter 10: Creating a new project: The development process. In Digital Storytelling: A Creator's Guide to Interactive Entertainment (pp. 183-206). Burlington, MA: Focal Press Elsevier.

Miller, C. H. (2005). Chapter 11: Video games. In Digital Storytelling: A Creator's Guide to Interactive Entertainment (pp. 209-224). Burlington, MA: Focal Press Elsevier.

Montfort, N. (2003). Toward a theory of interaction fiction (HTML). In E. Short (Ed.), IF Theory (3.5 ed.). St. Charles, IL: The Interactive Fiction Library.

Montfort, N. (2003). Twisty Little Passages: An Approach to Interactive Fiction (HTML) (First Paperback ed.). Cambridge: MIT Press.

Nelson, G., & Knight, C. (2003). Inform - A design system for interactive fiction (HTML) . Retrieved August 15, 2005, from www.inform-fiction.org

Robertson, J., & Good, J. (2005). Story creation in virtual game worlds (PDF). Communications of the ACM , 48 (1), 61-65.

Rollings, A., & Adams, E. (2003). Chapter 6: Creating the user experience (Word). In Andrew Rollings and Earnest Adams on Game Design (pp. 147-198). Indianapolis: New Riders.

Rollings, A., & Adams, E. (2003). Chapter 7: Gameplay (Word). In Andrew Rollings and Earnest Adams on Game Design (pp. 199-238). Indianapolis: New Riders.

Rollings, A., & Adams, E. (2003). Chapter 8: The internal economy of games and game balancing (Word). In Andrew Rollings and Earnest Adams on Game Design (pp. 239-288). Indianapolis: New Riders.

Shelton, B. E., & Wiley, D. (2006, April 7-11). Instructional designers take all the fun out of games: Rethinking elements of engagement for designing instructional games. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) 2006, San Francisco.

Squire, K., & Barab, S. Learning world history through computer simulation games"> Learning world history through computer simulation games (Word) .

Squire, K., Barnett, M., Grant, J. M., & Higginbotham, T. (2003). Electromagnetism supercharged! Learning physics with digital simulation games (Word) . Paper presented at the International Conference of the Learning Sciences 2004 (ICLS 04), Santa Monica, CA.

Steinkuehler, C. A. (2003, March 25). Videogaming as participation in a discourse (PDF) . Paper presented at the Annual Conference ofthe American Association for Applied Linguistics.

Takahashi, D. (2004, September 20). Game sequel takes leaps in AI technology (HTML). The Mercury News .

Taylor, C. (2000). Your Company's Design Template (ZIP) . Retrieved July 15, 2005, from www.designersnotebook.com/ctaylordesign.zip

Tews, R. R. (2001). Chapter 9: Archetypes on acid: Video games and culture. In M. J. P. Wolf (Ed.), The Medium of the Video Game (pp. 169-182). Austin: University of Texas Press.

Virvou, M., Katsionis, G., & Manos, K. (2005). Combining software games with education: Evaluation of its educational effectiveness (PDF). Educational Technology & Society , 8 (2), 54-65.

Wolf, M. J. P. (2001). Chapter 5: Narrative in the video game. In M. J. P. Wolf (Ed.), The Medium of the Video Game (pp. 93-112). Austin: University of Texas Press.

Wolf, M. J. P. (2001). Chapter 6: Genre and the video game (HTML). In M. J. P. Wolf (Ed.), The Medium of the Video Game (pp. 113-134). Austin: University of Texas Press.

You will either be responsible for the readings from Track A or Track B. You are responsible for the readings from your track, as you will be thoroughly reading each of them plus providing an overview of it in the vein of an executive summary by following the sections provided in the summary template. The summary template is designed to help you keep track of information you find to be of importance within the article, and will give you practice in keeping information useful in a literature review. You will also be responsible for skimming the reading from the alternate track, in order to meaningfully participate in class discussion based on both readings.

The summary template is designed to hold information similar to that which would be provided in an Endnote citation. One of the objectives in having you follow this format will be to practice gleaning key points from the readings that include quotes, and synthesizing/creating summaries of articles in your own words. Each summary template concludes with a section where you write questions that arose during your reading, or thoughts for exploration that the article brought forth. Only the summary for the reading(s) in your track and assigned to both tracks will be required for submission in each lesson, although I highly recommend you make it a practice to make summaries for all of your readings.
Copyright 2008, by the Contributing Authors. Cite/attribute Resource . admin. (2008, May 20). Readings. Retrieved January 07, 2011, from Free Online Course Materials — USU OpenCourseWare Web site: http://ocw.usu.edu/instructional-technology-learning-sciences/instructional-games/Readings.html. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons License
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