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Lesson 6: Track A Summaries

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Schedule   ::   Lesson 6   ::   Track A Summaries   ::   Track B Summaries


Gunter, B., Chapter 2: Tapping into players' habits and preferences

Reading summary/quotes:

This chapter contains a survey of existing research about video game players’ gaming habits and preferences. Explanations are given for many of the trends that are studied and observed. Concerns that video games are addictive have not been supported. Other research shows that children and adolescents play video games more than any other group. Males clearly dominate the video gamer population, in part due to the general perception that video game play is a masculine activity. This notion is reinforced by the violent, male-centric themes that are often used in video games. Also, because visual-spatial abilities of males are generally higher than females, this reinforces the male advantage in many video games.

“… a number of writers have expressed the concern that females might be at a disadvantage where computer usage is concerned, because computer and video games might provide an easy lead-in to computer literacy (p. 40).”

Related articles/class discussions:

Class discussion: This related to the class discussion on motivation. It is clear that there are different motivators for each gender in video games.

Discussion points/questions:

  • How can games be designed to be more female friendly?
  • Do males play the games because the games are more suited for males? Or because the games are designed by males? Or simply because males tend to be drawn to new kinds of technologies?
  • Do different types of video games engage different types of learning styles?


Contributors: Tom Caswell, Marion Jensen, Jennifer Jorgensen, Jon Scoresby, and Tim Stowell
Copyright 2008, by the Contributing Authors. Cite/attribute Resource . admin. (2008, May 20). Lesson 6: Track A Summaries. Retrieved January 07, 2011, from Free Online Course Materials — USU OpenCourseWare Web site: http://ocw.usu.edu/instructional-technology-learning-sciences/instructional-games/Lesson_6__Track_A_Summaries.html. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons License
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