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Unit 2: Fuels Classification

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Distribution & Behavior   ::   Characteristics   ::   Timelag & Life Cycle   ::   Availability   ::   Models   ::  Exercises

Exercise 1

Using The Fuel Model Key

Identify the appropriate fuel model for each fuel complex description below using the fuel model key. You should then check your selections with the fuel model description.

Fuel Description Fuel Model
1. An area in the Sierra Nevadas consists of an open park-like stand of Jeffrey pine of approximately 1/4 canopy cover with grassy understory, scattered low shrubs, and scattered litter.
  1. Fuel Model 1: Short Grass
  2. Fuel Model 2: Timber (Grass and understory)
  3. Fuel Model 3: Tall Grass
2. An Alaskan fuel type of aspen and birch mixed with white spruce has a sparse understory of shrubs and litter. Conditions are very dry.
  1. Fuel Model 8: Closed Timber Litter
  2. Fuel Model 9: Hardwood Litter
  3. Fuel Model 10: Timber (Litter and Understory)
3. A dense stand of southern yellow pine has a dense understory of palmett-gallberry brush 2-3 feet tall. the "rough" understory vegetation carries fire very well.
  1. Fuel Model 4: Chaparral
  2. Fuel Model 5: Brush
  3. Fuel Model 6: Intermediate Brush Hardwood Slash
  4. Fuel Model 7: Southern Rough
4. A partial cut of ponderosa pine in the southwest produces scattered and somewhat discontinuous slash up to 2 feet deep. A moderate amount of grasses, shrubs, and tree regenereation are present to carry fire.
  1. Fuel Model 11: Light Logging Slash
  2. Fuel Model 12: Medium Logging Slash
  3. Fuel Model 13: Heavy Logging Slash

Exercise 2

Analyzing Fuel Situations

Complete the items below using the following fuels photo and any fuels characteristics and fuel model materials presented in this unit.

Exercise 2

Question Options
1. What is the general vegetation or fuel?
  1. Grass
  2. Brush
  3. Timber
  4. Slash
2. What category fuel classes are present?
  1. 1 hour
  2. 10 hours
  3. 100 hours
  4. 1000 hours
  5. Live
3. Which two of the fuel classes in 2. above do you expect to influence fire behavior the most?
  1. 1 hour
  2. 10 hours
  3. 100 hours
  4. 1000 hours
  5. Live
4. What is the primary carrier of a fire here?
  1. Surface litter
  2. Tall grasses
  3. High loadings of dead, woody fuels
  4. Shrub understory
5. Do you think the overstory fuels would be involved in the flaming front? Explain.
6. What fuel model would you assign to this fuel situation?
  1. Fuel Model 2: Timber (Grass and understory)
  2. Fuel Model 4: Chapparral
  3. Fuel Model 7: Southern Rough
  4. Fuel Model 10: Timber (Litter and understory)

Exercise 3

Analyzing Fuel Situations

Complete the items below using the following fuels photo and any fuels characteristics and fuel model materials presented in this unit.

Exercise 3

Question Options
1. What is the general vegetation or fuel?
  1. Grass
  2. Brush
  3. Timber
  4. Slash
2. What category fuel classes are present?
  1. 1 hour
  2. 10 hours
  3. 100 hours
  4. 1000 hours
  5. Live
3. Which two of the fuel classes in 2. above do you expect to influence fire behavior the most?
  1. 1 hour
  2. 10 hours
  3. 100 hours
  4. 1000 hours
  5. Live
4. What is the primary carrier of a fire here?
  1. Surface litter
  2. Fine fuels throughout the complex
  3. Shrub understory
  4. Over-mature timber stands
5. Do you think the overstory fuels would be involved in the flaming front? Explain.
6. What fuel model would you assign to this fuel situation?
  1. Fuel Model 8: Closed Timber Litter
  2. Fuel Model 11: Light Logging Slash
  3. Fuel Model 4: Chaparral
  4. Fuel Model 6: Intermediate Brush Hardwood Slash
Copyright 2008, Michael Jenkins. Cite/attribute Resource . admin. (2005, October 05). Unit 2: Fuels Classification. Retrieved January 07, 2011, from Free Online Course Materials — USU OpenCourseWare Web site: http://ocw.usu.edu/Forest__Range__and_Wildlife_Sciences/Wildland_Fire_Management_and_Planning/Unit_2__Fuels_Classification_1.html. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons License